Write. Write. Draw. Write. Draw. Repeat.
The creative blog of Hayden Marie, in which a YA author posts exclusively about her ventures in writing and art.

My Art

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Hayden Marie Creations
Just Write It.

Progress. Still a long way to go! 

posted 13 hours ago @ 18 Sep 2014 with 10 notes

Old art dump #2! 

posted 16 hours ago @ 17 Sep 2014 with 3 notes

tamorapierce:

maggie-stiefvater:

maggie-stiefvater:

On Twitter today — and everyday — there was some chatter and scuffle about Some Authors’ Careers and Some Authors’ Fame and whether they had deserved it. Some folks invariably said the chatter and scuffle was jealousy. Some others invariably said not everything is jealousy.

Here’s what I think: having a writing career is like driving a race car.

I’m not really a grand race car driver, mostly because I’ve discovered that I don’t really care about winning against anyone but myself, which turns out to be not the point of organized sports. But I have been in race cars, and on race tracks, and have spent many hours doing classwork at over 70 mph. Enough to know that a writing career is a lot like driving a race car. 

One of the things they teach you in every single form of car racing is to keep your eyes up. Up. Upper than that. Upper than even that. Don’t look at the dash, because then you won’t see what’s happening on the road. Don’t look at the road right in front of you, because you won’t see that the turn you’re going into links into another turn and you could set yourself up for both. Put your eyes up as far as you can see down the road, and look there. Only when you see the absolute farthest point can you start to calculate the best way of getting there.

(this is great advice to use when you’re driving normally, by the way)

A writing career is like that. Use your peripheral vision to look at the things that are coming at you day to day, but never forget that every decision should contribute that farthest-away-point you want to get to. Never forget that every tiny success and failure is just a steer or counter steer toward the real point of the thing.

And here’s the other thing they tell you about keeping your eyes up: don’t fixate on the person in front of you. If there’s another driver just in front of you, the tendency is to stare at their bumper and then take the turn just like they do. But guess what? Then the absolute best scenario is that you will take the turn just like they do. So if they’re taking it wrong, you’ll take it wrong too. If there’s a better way, a faster way, a cooler way, a way that involves painting a giant knife on the side of your car and listening to Finnish rap very loudly, you’ll never know.

Eyes up, drivers, they say: look past the car in front of you. All you need to do is to note them well enough that you can pass them when you find a better way to take the turn.

Don’t fixate, writers. Eyes up, writers. I don’t care if x or y is doing a or b. What does that have to do with me? I have my eyes on where I want to go, and no one else matters.

The race is Maggie vs. Maggie. Who are you competing with?

reblogging this because the writer-envy piece in yesterday’s Salon hurts my soul on a most basic level.

It’s ludicrous to go comparing yourself to/being jealous of other writers.  It’s meaningless.  No one is going to write like you, even if they use the same themes and tropes, and there is no telling why one writer’s thing hits big and why the same ballpark thing, two years earlier, didn’t.  You may as well get angry because Jonathan Livingston Seagull hit big and your pelican book didn’t, or for my generation, Harry Potter.  It doesn’t work.

You could put twenty writers in a room, give them the same idea, and they would write twenty different things.  It’s absurd to be jealous. And the person who strives to write what the market demands or what is “hot” right now will fail, because markets and audiences change faster than the publishing system can turn books out.

All we can do is write what we want to write and understand that making ourselves happy is all we may get to do.  And, if we’re lucky, we’ll make a bit of money.  But we can’t guarantee we’ll write a bestseller.  No one can.  If you’re jealous of other writers, you’re simply wasting your own time and energy.  If you compare yourself to other writers, the same applies.  The only writer you should worry about, apart from reading for pleasure, is you.  You’re the only writer who matters then.

reblogged 1 day ago @ 17 Sep 2014 with 1,044 notes via/source

Old art! Have a few dumps of these, because I think it’s fun to see how far I’ve come. 

posted 1 day ago @ 16 Sep 2014 with 4 notes
Something completely different: For Linguistic anthropology a few years ago, me and some classmates had to create our own language then do a play entirely in that language for our final. I was in charge of symbols! I had little time, so they are rather rough, but it was so much fun. 
(You can see a snippet of the script/symbols in action here. (without the pronunciation guide) 

Something completely different: For Linguistic anthropology a few years ago, me and some classmates had to create our own language then do a play entirely in that language for our final. I was in charge of symbols! I had little time, so they are rather rough, but it was so much fun. 

(You can see a snippet of the script/symbols in action here. (without the pronunciation guide) 

posted 1 day ago @ 16 Sep 2014 with 11 notes

OC Meme #8: Fancy clothes 

Southerns aren’t know for their subtle fashion. 

posted 4 days ago @ 14 Sep 2014 with 11 notes

imagine-your-oc:

Send a number and I’ll draw my OC:

  1. In what they normally wear
  2. In what I’m currently wearing
  3. In a school uniform
  4. In swimwear
  5. In underwear
  6. With no clothes on
  7. In winter clothes
  8. In fancy clothes
  9. Making 3 different expressions
  10. Standing on their hands
  11. With their favorite animal
  12. Hanging out with a friend
  13. Sitting on the couch
  14. Doing something they don’t normally do
  15. Eating
  16. Playing a sport
  17. Beaten up
  18. As a kid/adult
  19. Wearing a funny hat
  20. Sleeping
reblogged 4 days ago @ 13 Sep 2014 with 43,228 notes via/source
Not…exactly where I was going with that, Scrinvner autocorrect, but an amiable guess. 

Not…exactly where I was going with that, Scrinvner autocorrect, but an amiable guess. 

posted 4 days ago @ 13 Sep 2014 with 17 notes

tokidoki-hokeypokey:

Give me a pairing and a number and I’ll draw them kissing.

(don’t know if this is already out there, but I suddenly felt like doing it)

  1. on the forehead
  2. on the nose
  3. on the cheek
  4. on the eyelids
  5. on the ear
  6. on the lips (cute)
  7. on the lips (passionate)
  8. on the chin
  9. on the neck
  10. on the shoulder
  11. on the back
  12. on the hand
  13. on the foot
  14. on the leg
  15. on the chest/torso

I DO need to practice kissing! 

(My OCs or fanart, if you’re not familiar with my kids!) 

reblogged 4 days ago @ 13 Sep 2014 with 14,042 notes via/source
Just me and my favorite things

Just me and my favorite things

posted 5 days ago @ 12 Sep 2014 with 13 notes